Archive for the ‘Film Festivals’ Category

Looking for Suggestions

December 31, 2012

After this year’s SXSW, I decided to refrain from posting. After all, as I said, I didn’t want to give away too many spoilers on this project. Also, I wanted to focus on finishing schooling, which I did in May. I actually thought about deleting this completely, but I decided to make this post instead.

If I still belonged to Shooting People, I might ask this question on one of their lists, but since I’m not, I’m posting it here.

I am looking for a music supervisor. Specifically someone who has experience working on low budget productions, and experience with negotiating with Indie Bands (and more than just bands pulled off of MySpace). If you know someone who fits my qualifications (or if you do), please contact me at erin at erinscherer.com.

Also, I’m looking for accommodations for 2013 SXSW. Preferably something that’s within three miles of the Austin Convention Center. These are accommodations for two people (women). The cheaper the better.

Otherwise, Happy New Year!

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Looking for accommodations for Austin

February 18, 2012

Next month, my friend and I will be coming to Austin for this year’s SXSW Film Festival. At this point, I pretty much have everything in place: our flights have been arranged, and we have our passes. I’m so close to it I can taste it! Only one major thing we still need…

…Housing. We will be arriving on Friday, March 9th, and leaving on Wednesday evening, March 14th. We are currently searching for accommodations, and would prefer a location that’s within three miles of Austin Convention Center (makes it convenient for cheaper cab rides), and near a bus stop. Please understand that we are on a tight budget, and are looking for accommodations that $150 per night or less.

If you have accommodations for us, please contact me at erin at erinscherer.com using the subject line “SXSW QCC Blog Housing”. Thank you.

RIP Whitney…

A Prelimary Investigation Into Final Cut Pro

October 23, 2011

My last post got me really fired up about software and hardware, and what types of software and hardware I want to use with this movie.

I would very much like to edit this movie on Final Cut Pro. In the past, I’ve used Adobe Premiere Pro, which is what I trained on back in college. In order to get Final Cut Pro, though, I will need to get a Mac.

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Writing and Directing Your First Feature: From Your Story to “Epic Fail”

October 19, 2011

Last fall, when the initial burst of energy to write the script for this movie came about (and I still had a job), I subscribed to both Script and Creative Screenwriting. The March/April 2011 issue came along in the mail. This particular issue had some articles that offered advice for new writer/directors, and I was interested in seeing how their advice lined up with the stuff that I’ve learned the past few years.

One article that really caught my eye was “Writing and Directing Your First Feature: From Your Story to ‘Film By'”, penned by USC Grad Student Robert Piluso. The article is focused on the hardware and software associated with filmmaking and its uses. Of course, there’s a discussion of Final Draft (Script is owned by Final Draft), Gorilla, Movie Magic Scheduling, and Final Cut Pro. I don’t think I would’ve had as much of a problem, had Piluso kept to his main focus–software and hardware–rather than veering off into festival submission and exhibition, which is article unto itself. Piluso could’ve heeded his own advice and used his two interviewees as a jumping off point for his own research rather than designating them as authorities.

That’s not to say that Piluso doesn’t get a few things right. He manages to avoid making his article into a collection of press releases and soundbites, as Script‘s articles tend to be. He does recognize that with a smaller budget, your film will need to be more personal in nature in order to work. Having a tight script doesn’t hurt. Finally, he stays away from making hackneyed references to El Mariachi and Clerks, two broadly known microbudget classics that have no bearing on today’s indie film landscape.

As someone with a few bad specs in my past, I know that spec writers are used to taking dogmatic advice from people who have worked mainly on the periphery of screenwriting (The late Blake Snyder and J. Michael Straczynski are exceptions to this rule), and are used to tailoring scripts for a market that’s becoming increasingly narrower in taste. In turn, these gurus have very rigid ideas as to what makes a good story. The festival circuit, with its more diverse aesthetic, is more interested in personal vision than a product aimed at a demographic. As I recall overhearing filmmaker Benny Safdie saying outside of a screening at this year’s BAM Cinemafest, “These films aren’t for everybody, but they’re for anybody.”

I’ve uploaded a PDF of Piluso’s original article for you to read and judge for yourself. The article is copyright its respective owners.

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Career Options

June 7, 2011

Ted Hope recently tweeted that his most read post since moving his blog over to IndieWire was a post titled, “A ‘Career’ In Indie Film? Better Have That Second Job Lined Up…“. The crux of the post is basically this: whereas once you could sustain a living as an independent filmmaker, you now need to have a “day job”.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, I got laid off back in February. One of the ups of being laid off was that my co-workers and I were approved for Trade Act Funding. One of our trainers at my last job busted his ass to have us all approved for this. Thus, the progress of this project has been delayed by thoughts of, “Where do I go from here?” At the risk of being self-indulgent, I really don’t want to be working at just above minimum wage for the rest of my life. It would be nice to have something to fall back on that would allow me to support myself, be independent, and be able to continue on this lovely path of making movies.

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SXSW is now officially a really, REALLY BIG DEAL

March 24, 2010

I missed out on SXSW this year. I couldn’t afford to go, and with my situation, I couldn’t justify it, either.

It was packed this year. People complained. I talked to two attendees and both said it was incredibly crowded. Here’s what Chad Hartigan (a fine director in his own right) tweeted me:

My other friend said he was able to get in and see almost everything he wanted to see, but attributed that to knowing the right people.

What prompted this post was Karina Longworth’s write up on the festival. Unlike the previous article, Longworth defers the blame to the festival’s slow burn:

If the fest’s planners failed to see the tipping point coming, perhaps it’s because it’s been so slow to arrive. In past years, it’s taken a long while for the masses to care about the stuff that SXSW audiences eat up (Greta Gerwig, the it-girl of SXSW 2007, may co-star in the new Noah Baumbach movie, but she’s hardly a household name), if they ever come to care at all (the 2009 Seth Rogen comedy Observe and Report was a major SXSW hit and notable box-office bomb). This year, the SXSW audiences were the masses.

Meanwhile, Todd Sklar of Range Life made this observation:

The “Mumblecore” movement is what prompted me to want to pursue this movie. I’ve never had too much trouble getting into the movies I want to see the last two years I attended the festival. Then again, I’ve always been there early enough. I was seriously hoping to submit this movie to SXSW once it’s finished (If it ever gets made). While this development doesn’t leave me entirely daunted, it does make me nervous.

However, if the film festival has superceded the music festival it grew out of, that is a sign of the times indeed.

Fans, Friends, and Followers

January 25, 2010

Earlier tonight, I finished reading Scott Kirsner’s Fans, Friends, and Followers. I was going to write another long, elaborate review about the book. It was a very resourceful book, and I got a lot of valuable advice. But I’m at a point where I want to move beyond how to put myself out there.

Meanwhile, Children Of Invention, a movie I blogged about a few days ago, is up as a rental on YouTube this week for $3.99. I watched it last night, and I really enjoyed it. YouTube also has a few other Sundance selections up for rental, including Bass Ackwards (whose distribution fundraiser I also contributed to), and One Too Many Mornings. With the premieres of movies like Lovers of Hate, Howl, and Cyrus, and the NEXT showcase, I sincerely wish I was in Park City right now.

Maybe next year.